Reno Tahoe Blog

What's Happening Now

Posts Tagged ‘winter’

Reno Aces Will Host Reno’s Ice Rink This Winter

ace skating

Reno’s popular ice skating rink is moving to a new location this winter: Reno Ace’s Ballpark! This new “Ace Skating” spot should be a positive change, as it gives skaters a fun place to go and allows the Reno Aces to stay connected to fans and locals during their off season. With 20 downtown area lots within walking distance from the ballpark, parking should be hassle-free for anybody who is heading to the rink. For pre- and post-skating indulgences, the Aces Ballpark has options such as Arroyo Mexican Grill and the Freight House District, along with the abundance of dining spots throughout Downtown Reno. The rink will open on November 25 and is said to be open through February with special times for holiday sessions. The Aces are hosting a Family Skate Day on November 28, so bring all of your relatives to the rink to continue your Thanksgiving family fun! Session prices vary by age, but you can also purchase a 10-Visit Punch Pass if you know you’ll be doing a lot of skating this winter!  Ice skating is the perfect activity for the winter/holiday season. It’s reasonably priced, convenient, and fun for people of every age, so don’t miss out on this Reno winter tradition!

Skating rink hours will vary during the week but are set for 10 a.m. to 11:15 p.m. Saturdays and 10 a.m. to 8:45 p.m. Sundays.

Admission to the skating rink is $7.50 for ages 13-54. For children 3-12 and seniors 55 and older, the cost is $5.50. Skates can be rented for $2.50 per session.

Also, Christmas-themed movies are planned in the 250 lounge at the stadium, in addition to other special happenings.

If you’re excited about ice skating but aren’t able to to brave the cold, check out the LIVE STREAM on the City of Reno website!

For information on hours, ticket pricing, and any other stuff you can think of head to the Reno Aces website to find the answers to all of your questions!

Christmas on the Comstock

This Saturday, Dec. 7, 2013, Virginia City, Nev. kicks off its annual holiday tradition, Christmas on the Comstock. Located just 25 miles from Reno, the town boasts the Parade of Lights, a country Christmas concert and Breakfast with Father Christmas. The festivities continue throughout the month with unique gifts and boutique holiday shopping at local merchants.

Breakfast with Father Christmas – Dec. 7, 9 – 11 a.m.

Join Father Christmas for breakfast, photos and a chance to share Christmas wishes at Piper’s Opera House. Price: Adults $10, Kids $8.

The Candy Cane Express Trains –Dec. 7-8 and 14-15. Two departures daily: noon and 2 p.m.

Create holiday memories aboard the Candy Cane Express Holiday Train on the famous Virginia & Truckee Railroad. Delight with visits from the Candy Cane Sisters while sipping hot chocolate, spiced apple cider and enjoying delicious cookies and candy canes. Price: $14 adults, $7 children, ages 2 and under free. Purchase tickets online.

Christmas Movies at Piper’s Opera House Dec. 7, 12 – 4 p.m.

Bring the kids to watch classic Christmas movies at the historic Piper’s Opera House before the Parade of Lights. Price: FREE.

Christmas on the Comstock Parade of Lights – Dec. 7, 5 p.m.

Bundle up and gather along C Street for Virginia City’s only evening parade and watch as the town lights up with Christmas cheer. Price: FREE.

6_6_6_christma-on-the-comstock

Christmas in the Sierra – Concert with David John & The Comstock Cowboys, Dec. 7, 7:30 p.m.

Bring your cowboy boots and Santa hat to this boot-stomping good time with David John and the Comstock Cowboys for a country Christmas concert at Piper’s Opera House. Buy your tickets in advance online. Price:  $25.

Photos with Father Christmas – Saturdays and Sundays, 11 a.m. – 3 p.m.

Stop by the Virginia City Visitors Center at 86 South C Street to meet Father Christmas and create a holiday memory. Call 775-847-7500 for more information.

Virginia City Merchant Christmas Gift Giveaway, Dec. 7 – Dec. 30, merchant business hours vary.

Pick up a lucky number card at Forever Christmas, The Mark Twain Museum or the Visitor Center for a chance to win one of 2,000 free gifts at over 20 participating merchants. Price: FREE.

Gingerbread Social and Charity Auction – Dec. 8, 5 p.m.
Enter your gingerbread creation for a chance to win fabulous prizes at Piper’s Opera House. Price: FREE.

To purchase tickets and for more information on Christmas on the Comstock events taking place in Virginia City, Nev., visit online or call the Virginia City Tourism Commission at 775-847-7500.

The Great Santa Dash 2013

Run before you Crawl and support the “claus”!

the-great-santa-dash-logoMax out on holiday cheer and participate in the Great Santa Dash the morning of the Reno Santa Pub Crawl! Sport a festive Christmas costume if you want to avoid Santa’s naughty list, plus all adult Santas (21+) will receive a FREE SANTA CRAWL CUP!

The start of the run is located in downtown Reno at Wingfield Park, December 14th, 2013 at 10am. Runners of all ages and levels are encouraged to participate.

Reindeer Charities will donate all of the proceeds from cups to local schools. In addition to giving to local schools, The Great Santa Dash will proudly support AIY Foundation which is the charitable portion of Athlete in You, LLC.  The AIY Foundation’s mission is to contribute athletic equipment, helps to restore physical education programs, and educate school children about the importance of a healthy and active lifestyle.

CLICK HERE to REGISTER

Rink on the River 2013

‘Tis the season to get on ice!

8343240151_90a06ef275_hLocated in downtown Reno next to the Truckee River, Rink on the River delights ice skaters with a charming holiday outing.  Rink on the River is scheduled to be open through Sunday, February 2.

The rink attracts everyone from first timers to pros, making the Rink on the River a cool outing for anyone this season. Lessons are available for those looking to take to the ice at the next level – even if that means letting go of the wall. Sign up for group lessons or private lessons are also available by appointment. Call (775) 334-2262 for more information.

The rink operates every day during the season to keep the holiday spirits flowing (unless the weather outside gets frightful)!

Rink on the River Regular Hours of Operation

  • Monday: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 6 p.m. to 10 p.m.
  • Tuesday: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 6 p.m. to 10 p.m.
  • Wednesday: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 6 p.m. to 10 p.m.
  • Thursday: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 6 p.m. to 10 p.m.
  • Friday: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 6 p.m. – 11 p.m.
  • Saturday: 11 a.m. to 11 p.m.
  • Sunday: 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.

Reno Tree Lighting 2013

6691063845_f4cbb3a862_bThe annual holiday tree lighting will be Tuesday, November 26 at 5pm followed by the opening of Rink on the River.

This fun and magical event features musical entertainment and a much anticipated countdown of the tree lighting with City Council members to kick off the holiday season in downtown Reno. The tree is at the corner of S. Virginia and First Streets, next to the Rink on the River. Billinghurst Middle School Choir will sing holiday carols starting at 5 pm.

Bring a donation of new gloves, socks, hats or scarves for the Salvation Army and get free skate rental!

Next Stop: Reno/Tahoe

next stopNext Stop TV Show, powered by Alaska Airlines, recently ventured to Reno Tahoe to get an insiders guide to an epic Reno Tahoe vacation.  Their adventure leads them to mountaintop panoramic views with Lake Tahoe Snowmobile, an “over-the-top crazy” event at SnowFest, bluebird skiing at Diamond Peak, Tahoe-style luxury at Hyatt Regency Lake Tahoe Resort, Casino and Spa, great eats at Campo Reno, the mixology behind EDGE Nightspot, and a taste of local music with former NBC “The Voice” contestant Whitney Myer. Check it out:

North Lake Tahoe SnowFest 2013

Every spring since 1982, North Lake Tahoe comes alive with 10 fun-filled days and nights jam packed with events and activities for all ages. This year, the annual favorites will return March 1-10, along with a host of great new ones! On and off the mountain, at North Tahoe’s numerous resorts and vibrant lakeside neighborhoods, there’s something for everyone.

336545_10151287843365001_4888850_oIn its 32nd year, SnowFest, is expected to draw thousands of attendees, with the majority of events free to spectators.

Event Highlights:

Opening Night Ceremonies, Laser Show, Torchlight Parade and Fireworks at Squaw Valley (March 1)

Mamasake Extreme Food Challenge for those with a strong stomach (March 1)

Jack London Commemorative Sierra Sled Dog Derby (March 2-3)

SnowFest23rd Annual Gar Woods Polar Bear Swim in Tahoe’s frigid waters (March 2)

SnowFest Parades in Tahoe City and Kings Beach (March 2 and March 9 respectively)

Rahlves’ Banzai Tour at Squaw Valley (March 2-3)

37th Annual Great Ski Race, a 30-kilometer cross country race from Tahoe City to Truckee (March 3)

Jake’s Mardi Gras on the Lake Party (March 4)

Truckee’s Fastest Bartender Contest (March 6)

Blue Agave’s Indoor River Rafting and Trivia Night in Tahoe City (March 8)

Mother-Son Laser Tag at the Rideout Community Center on the West Shore (March 8)

Rahlves’ Banzai Tour at Sugar Bowl Ski Resort on Donner Summit (March 9-10)

25th Annual Snow Sculpture Contest at Tahoe City’s River Ranch Lodge (March 10)

Ta-Hoe Nalu Arctic Standup Paddleboard Race in Kings Beach (March 10)

For more information about SnowFest and a complete list of events, visit the organization’s website at http://www.tahoesnowfestival.com/. There you can also click to follow the event via Facebook and Twitter.

Rink on the River 2012-2013 Season

Downtown Reno’s Rink on the River is scheduled to open Tuesday, November 20, through Sunday, February 3!

Whether you’ve mastered a triple axel, it’s your first time on ice, or you’re looking to spectate, the Rink on the River makes everyone giddy for the winter season.

Reno’s Holiday Tree Lighting marks the opening of Rink on the River

On Tuesday, November 20, at 4:30pm, the event begins with charming carolers. At 5:15, Mayor Bob Cashell will light the tree, declaring the rink open!

2258333717_57b52c036e_b

The Rink is located at the corner of First and Virginia Street along the Truckee River.

Admission: $7.50 adults (ages 13-54)
$5.50 youth (ages 3-12)
$5.50 seniors (ages 55+)
Skate Rentals: $2.50 – Skates from kids size 7 to adult size 13 figure or size 15 hockey are available.
10 Visit
Punch Passes:
Including Skate Rental: $85 for adults, $65 for youth & seniors
Without Skate Rental: $65 for adults, $45 for youth & seniors
Season Passes $140 adults, $100 youth & seniors.
Admission only; does not include skate rental.
Regular Open Skate Hours:

Monday                 10 am – 1 pm
Tuesday                 10 am – 1 pm
Wednesday            10 am – 1 pm
Thursday                10 am – 1 pm
Friday                    10 am – 1 pm
Saturday
Sunday

*Rink will close at 6pm on Dec 2 and 9

6 – 10 pm
7:30 – 10 pm
6 - 10 pm
6 - 10 pm
6 – 11 pm
11 am – 11 pm
11 am - 9 pm

How to have a safe and fun trip in the Sierra Nevada Range this Winter

Winter TruckeeOk, the snow dances have finally worked and we officially have snow accumulations in the Sierra. People travel far and wide to bear witness to our unbelievable snow conditions, and those plans to visit Reno Tahoe are underway!

Winter driving on roads and the highways in the Sierra can be a bit uncomfortable for some people who haven’t driven in snowy conditions before, but it can ultimately be a pleasurable journey if you are prepared.  Always remember, getting there is just the beginning of your winter vacation, and once you make it to your destination, the fun and adventure really starts. Plus, we are incredibly lucky that our road crews in California and Nevada work around the clock to keep our roadways clear and safe.

Before heading into the Sierra or any other snow country here is a list of several things to take care of before you leave the house:

  • Make sure your windshield wipers, defroster, heater, exhaust system and brakes are in top condition.
  • Check your tires. Make sure the tread is in good condition and they are properly inflated.
  • At all times, try to keep your gas tank at least half full to avoid gas line freeze-up.
  • If possible, avoid using your parking brake in cold, rainy and snowy weather, as it may freeze up and no longer disengage.
  • Check your antifreeze and be ready for freezing temperatures.
  • Make sure you have concentrated (non freezing) windshield washer fluid to the windshield washer fluid reservoir to prevent an icy windshield.
  • Always carry chains. Make sure they are the proper size for your tires and are in working order. You might want to take along a flashlight and chain repair links. Chains must be installed on the drive wheels. Make sure you know if your vehicle is front or rear wheel drive.
  • Carry about $50 in cash (smaller denominations are best) in case you get to a point and need to have assistance putting chains on, and taken off of your vehicle.  
  • It is also a good idea to take along water, non-perishable food, warm blankets and extra clothing. A lengthy delay will make you glad you have them.
  • Weather conditions may warrant you to detour from the main road. It is strongly suggested that you always keep an updated map containing the Sierra area.
  • Put an extra car key in your pocket. Many motorists keep their vehicles running when they get out of their vehicle to keep the vehicle warm and have locked themselves out of their cars when putting on chains and at ski areas.

 Once you have your vehicle ready to go, think about these driving tips as you get on the road:

  • Avoid driving while you’re fatigued. Getting the proper amount of rest before taking on winter weather tasks reduces driving risks.
  • Do not use cruise control when driving on any slippery surface (wet, ice, sand).
  • Always allow enough time for your trip. Winter driving in the Sierras can take longer than other times of the year, especially if you encounter storm conditions or icy roads. So, get an early start and allow plenty of time to reach your destination.
  • Accelerate and decelerate slowly. Applying the gas slowly to accelerate is the best method for regaining traction and avoiding skids.  Remember: It takes longer to slow down on icy roads.
  • Drive slowly. Everything takes longer on snow-covered roads. Normal dry pavement following distance of three to four seconds should be increased to eight to ten seconds.
  • Don’t stop if you can avoid it.  But if you need to stop, keep the heel of your foot on the floor and use the ball of your foot to apply firm, steady pressure on the brake pedal.
  • If you can help it, don’t stop going up a hill. There’s nothing worse than trying to get moving up a hill on an icy road. Get some inertia going on a flat roadway before you take on the hill.
  • Keep your gas tank full. It may be necessary to change routes or turn back during a bad storm or you may be caught in a traffic delay.
  • Keep windshield and windows clear. You may want to stop at a safe turnout to use a snow brush or scraper. Use the car defroster and a clean cloth to keep the windows free of fog.
  • Slow down. Even if you have a 4-wheel drive truck, a highway speed of 65 miles per hour may be safe in dry weather, but an invitation for trouble on snow and ice.
  • Be more observant. Visibility is often limited in winter by weather conditions. Slow down and watch for other vehicles that have flashing lights, visibility may be so restricted during a storm that it is difficult to see the slow moving equipment.
  • When stalled, stay with your vehicle and try to conserve fuel while maintaining warmth. Be alert to any possible exhaust or monoxide problems.

Here are a few tips for driving in the Sierra during icy or snowy weather:

  • Accelerate and decelerate slowly. Applying the gas slowly to accelerate is the best method for regaining traction and avoiding skids. Don’t try to get moving in a hurry. And take time to slow down for a stoplight. Remember: It takes longer to slow down on icy roads.
  • Drive slowly. Everything takes longer on snow-covered roads. Accelerating, stopping, turning – nothing happens as quickly as on dry pavement. Give yourself time to maneuver by driving slowly.
  • The normal dry pavement following distance of three to four seconds should be increased to eight to ten seconds (5 car lengths). This improved margin of safety will provide the longer space needed if you have to stop.
  • Whether you have antilock brakes or not, the best way to stop is threshold breaking. Keep the heel of your foot on the floor and use the ball of your foot to apply firm, steady pressure on the brake pedal.
  • Don’t stop if you can avoid it. There’s a big difference in the amount of inertia it takes to start moving from a full stop versus how much it takes to get moving while still rolling. If you can slow down enough to keep rolling until a traffic light changes, do it.
  • Don’t power up hills. Applying extra gas on snow-covered roads will just start your wheels spinning.   As you reach the top of a hill, reduce your speed and possible down shift as you proceed downhill as slowly as possible.
  • Don’t stop going up an incline. There’s nothing worse than trying to get moving up a hill on an icy road. 

If you end up entering an area that has chain controls;

  • You must stop and put on chains when highway signs indicate chains are required. You can be cited and fined if you don’t. You will usually have about a half a mile to a mile between the “Chains Required” sign and the checkpoint to confirm you have installed your chains.
  • Control areas can change rapidly from place to place because of changing weather and road conditions.
  • In most cases, the speed limit when chains are required is 15 to 25 miles an hour.
  • When you put on chains, wait until you can pull completely off the roadway to the right. Do not stop in a traffic lane where you will endanger yourself and block traffic.
  • If you use a chain installer, be sure to get a receipt and jot the installer’s badge number on it. Remember, chain installers are independent business people, and are not allowed by law to sell or rent chains.
  • When removing chains, drive beyond the signs reading “End of Chain Control” to a pull-off area where you can safely remove them.

 

In the event you see a snowplow or other snow removal equipment on the road, here are a few simple rules to follow:

  • Use care when following, passing or approaching any snow removal equipment, even if it appears to be parked.
  • Drive a safe distance behind snowplows. Plows often travel slower than other vehicles to remove snow and to apply sand and liquid deicers.
  • Before attempting to pass snow removal equipment, check the direction the snow and debris is being thrown from the vehicle. Also, remember that snowplows are wider than most vehicles and portions of the plow and blade may be obscured by blowing snow.
  • Don’t ever drive extended distances beside a snowplow, as they can shift sideways after hitting snow packs or drifts.
  • When a plow approaches you, allow the plow room to operate by reducing speed and moving to the right side of the road if there is room to safely do so.
  • Make sure to not brake with unnecessary sudden movements when in front of a snowplow – they cannot stop as quickly as a standard automobile.

 

If you are making a winter kit for your vehicle, here is a short recommended list of what you may want to include in that kit:

  • Rechargeable flashlight
  • Cell phone car adapter
  • Non-perishable food and water
  • Flares
  • Tools: jack, lug wrench and collapsible  shovel
  • Road maps for your trip and the surrounding areas
  • Blanket or sleeping bag(s)
  • Spare set of warm dry clothes, boots, hat and gloves
  • First aid kit, including a couple of days of any prescription medications
  • Pocket knife
  • Matches or lighter
  • Battery jumper cables
  • Ice scraper and snow brush
  • Paper towels
  • Extra windshield washer fluid     

If you travel with young children, an infant or baby, pack extra age appropriate food, warm clothes and blankets, toys, and extra diapers (if appropriate)  just in case. Most importantly, remember to make sure your child safety seat is installed properly.

Before leaving on your trip, tell a friend where you are going, the planned route, and when you anticipate arriving. Keep them updated on any major route or arrival changes.

Numbers and websites to know before you go:

CALTRANS Highway Conditions:

NDOT (Nevada Department of Transportation) Winter Driving Conditions

Reno Tahoe Weather

Lake Tahoe Is looking prime for White Christmas adventures for Locals and Travelers. Our reporters on the front lines are calling in data as we speak: over a foot in the last 24 hours @ Squaw Valley. More coming down!!!”

Tahoe CamsSo you’re sitting in your cozy office in East Whereversville USA and want to know if this is the weekend to hike, fly or drive out to Tahoe for some rip roaring skiing or snowboarding. But you’re worried that your trip will be ruined by LACK of nasty, cold, stormy weather with HEAVY snow followed by STUNNING bluebird views of the lake…

Well never fear, here are some links to make it easy for you to pick a day when the heavy snow falls, and you can wake up and rip sick powder face-shots in the sun!

  • Weather.com: easy to read and lots of good tools.
  • Noaa.gov: kinda techy, but you can get storm animations. this is where local TV and most websites get their data.
  • Snotel: A network of automated weather and snow monitors around the country. Marlette Lake is a few feet above Tahoe on the East Shore.
  • TahoeCam: see current weather conditions all over Tahoe!
  • MagnifEYE: Want to SEE the traffic, snowcover (or lack thereof) on I-80 before you head up to the lake? Check out the Kingvale pic…

-MTB