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HOLLAND PROJECT GALLERY TO FEATURE EIGHT NATIONAL PHOTOGRAPHERS CELEBRATING SNOWBOARDING AT ITS BEST

Exhibit opens January 14 with the opening reception scheduled for Friday, January 18, and a special movie premier at the Nevada Museum of Art Saturday, February 2

The Holland Project Gallery will host Built to Weather, a group photography exhibit celebrating eras, pivotal moments and stellar landscapes related to snowboarding. It’s the first time a show of this context and caliber has been exhibited in Reno.

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The exhibit opens January 14 and runs through February 8 at the Holland Project Gallery located at 140 Vesta St. between Wells Avenue and Virginia Street in Reno.  The opening reception for Built to Weather will take place Friday, January 18 from 6 p.m. – 8 p.m. at the Holland Project.

Built to Weather will feature eight renowned photographers including: Bud Fawcett, Ian Ruhter, Mike Basich, Jim Zellers with Richard Leversee, Mike Yoshida, Paul Laca, Chris Carnel and Tim Peare.

The exhibit curator Chris Carnel has tracked down prominent works from these diverse globetrotting photographers to form a unique crew of individuals intrinsically involved with snowboarding. This diverse selection of photographs features pinnacle, historical moments involving iconic individuals that have lived and breathed the life of the sport.

In conjunction with the exhibit, the Nevada Museum of Art will be screening Basich’s film Open Space at 1 p.m. on Saturday, February 2. Admission is $5.  The film will be followed by a question and answer session with Chris Carnel and Ian Ruhter. They will speak about their involvement in documenting the sport; Ruhter from both sides of the camera. Ruhter will also elaborate on his cutting edge style of shooting involving a truck and wet plates as well his work in Built to Weather and being an ex-pro in the sport.

Of the group, Bud Fawcett has photographed some of the inaugural moments in snowboarding history. Fawcett moved to Tahoe in the early 1980’s. He came from the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina with a background in photojournalism to document the earliest inklings of what freestyle snowboarding would become. Fawcett also became the photo editor for the legendary International Snowboard Magazine in the late 80’s. His subjects like Terry Kidwell, Shaun Palmer and Keith Kimmel were way ahead of the curve and heavily influenced by iconic vert skaters like Hosoi and Caballero.

Representing a more current end of the spectrum, Richard Leversee photographs of Jim Zellers in the exhibition depict a noteworthy moment in snowboarding history. Zellers, early mountaineer in the world of snowboarding, was documented by Leversee as the first and only person to snowboard the 45 degree cable-route side of Yosemite’s Half-Dome. In 2001, after five years of winter attempts, Zellers and Leversee hiked through the night to arrive in perfect conditions to climb and freeride down Half-Dome unassisted.

Curating these images by Fawcett and Leversee as well as photographs by Ruhter, Basich, Yoshida, Laca and Peare, Chris Carnel is drawing from his own experience within the sport. Having grown up in Reno, Carnel started shooting photography in the mid-80’s. By the end of the 90’s, he had worked with International Snowboard Magazine ISM (ISM), Snowboarder Magazine, Thrasher, Trans-World Snowboarding, Bikini and Heckler. In 2001 he helped publish A Declaration of Independents. Through his early and continued involvement in snowboarding, Carnel brings an authentic knowledge of the sport to the work he has selected for the exhibition.

For more information on Built to Weather, please visit www.hollandreno.org.

7 Reasons to be Thankful for Spending Thanksgiving Weekend in Reno Tahoe

There are a lot of reasons to be thankful this Thanksgiving. In addition to our loving fans and family, we have 7 more reasons Reno Tahoe is the place to spend your Thanksgiving holiday.

1. We encourage you to step away from the roaster

Relax. Let us take care of Thanksgiving this year, we’ll even do all of your dishes – said no one ever …said our culinary experts!!

2. Lake Tahoe Ski Resorts are OPEN

Snow dumped the mountains allowing ski resorts to open early, then the storm cleared out for a blue sky Thanksgiving weekend… Mother Nature, we thank you!

3. Party Thanksgiving Eve at BuBinga

NYE has some friendly competition. Before the family dysfunction and food-induced coma, burn off that extra helping stuffing and gravy by dancing the night away at BuBinga Lounge. Feast on $3 drink specials – like pumpkin pie shots, Wild Turkey and Coors Lights.

2532052910_2c5b882c6c4. It’s Opening Weekend of Rink on the River

There is nothing like introducing the holidays with a few laps around the ice rink, hot cocoa in hand, and taking in the sights of Reno’s downtown Christmas tree glistening next to the Truckee River.

5. Time for the annual Scheels Turkey Trot

Trot away extra calories with friends and family, and give thanks to good health Thanksgiving morning at the Sparks Marina.

6. There is a wide variety of entertainment lined up

What do Rodney Carrington, Alice Cooper and The Commodores have in common? Not much, aside from they are famous and performing in Reno Tahoe Thanksgiving weekend!

7. Hotel deals!

Stay and ski packages, 3rd night FREE, our hotels want you to sleep comfortably this holiday season.

Your Guide to Easter in Reno Tahoe

This Sunday, April 8, brings another exciting Easter to Reno Tahoe USA, where you can enjoy traditional egg hunts with your kids, Sunday brunch or take egg hunting to the extreme with avalanche beacons and SCUBA tanks!

Sugar Bowl Resort

The annual hunt for the Golden Egg is on at Sugar Bowl Resort! Clues to the Golden Egg’s whereabouts, as well as festive Easter treats, will be hidden in colored eggs throughout the resort. Keep an eye for the Easter Bunny on slopes as he’ll be skiing around, handing out candy, taking photos and might have additional information on the location of the Golden Egg. The first guest to find the coveted Golden Egg will win a 2012-2013 Mid-week Season Pass!

easter-egg-huntNorthstar California

Northstar California has a slate of Easter festivities scheduled for all ages; including, an egg hunt in the Village at Northstar starting at 10:30 am; live music from 2:30 – 5:30 pm at Baxter’s Patio, Chocolate Bar patio and the Village Stage; a special Easter parade marching through the Village at 4:45 pm; and photos with the Eater Bunny all day.

Alpine Meadows

Alpine Meadows is taking Easter egg hunting to a whole new level with the Beacon & Eggs search contest. Hunt for buried backpacks containing great prizes in a one-acre area using avalanche beacons set to “search” mode.  The event starts at 9:00 am and is free!

Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe

Join Mt. Rose for the Easter Sunday Brunch & Egg Hunt where you’ll enjoy a delicious meal of fresh fruit, pancakes with strawberries and whipped cream and eggs benedict at Winters Creek Lodge from 8:00 am – 2:00 pm, and kids will have a blast hunting for Eater eggs at the main lodge starting at noon.

Reno Aces

For the biggest Easter egg hunt in downtown Reno, bring the kids to the Aces Ballpark and win awesome team prizes! Be sure to stick around after the hunt to watch the Aces take on the Colorado Springs Sky Sox. The Easter egg hunt is for fans 12 and under, and the game kicks off at 1:05 pm.

Scheels

For a fun-filled Easter Sunday, bring your kids with their baskets to Scheels for the Easter Egg Scavenger Hunt. Not only will they hunt for eggs filled with toys and candy, but also receive a free ride on the Ferris Wheel!

Easter excitement around the Lake:

Here are a few other Easter activities taking place around beautiful Lake Tahoe:

  • Underwater Egg HuntSierra Dive invites all you SCUBA divers out there to the annual underwater Easter Egg Hunt at Sand Harbor Lake Tahoe. Dive into the brisk Tahoe waters and collect as many eggs as you can from 11:00 am to 12:15 pm.  Prizes include diving DVDs, underwater phone protectors, defogger and more.

Also, be sure to check out Reno Tahoe’s Easter dining specials!

Zimride Reimagines Tahoe Travel

As ski season heats up, Zimride partners with all major resorts and bus operators to a make a one-stop shop for fun, affordable and sustainable Tahoe travel.

zimride-logo-150Zimride, the largest online ride-sharing service in North America, announced it has established partnerships with all major Lake Tahoe ski resorts and two connecting bus services, making traveling to the Bay Area’s hottest winter tourist destination more simple and economical than ever before.

2564840233_5e40a50f47Tahoe travelers choosing to rideshare with Zimride will be entered to win free gas.  Additionally, for the first time Zimride has extended its rideshare offerings to include bus options as well.  Bay Area Ski Bus and Quality Assurance Travel have partnered with Zimride to sell tickets through the Zimride.com website, making the company a one-stop shop for Bay Area residents looking to find less expensive and more social rides to Tahoe.

“We’re not just providing an alternative to Tahoe travel, we’re reinventing it,” says John Zimmer, co-founder and COO of Zimride. “There’s huge demand for social, sustainable and affordable travel, and this week our users have posted over 1,000 seats available for purchase along our Tahoe route.  That’s the equivalent of four airline flights and we’re just getting started.  The unprecedented collaboration from the major resorts and bus operators demonstrates the need for Zimride as a new form of transportation.”

If just 10 percent of Tahoe travelers choose to travel with 2 additional people this season, Zimride estimates it would take 60,000 cars off the rode, save $12 million in vehicle operating costs and eliminate 18.6 million lbs of carbon dioxide from being emitted.

To be a driver or passenger along the Zimride Tahoe route simply go to: www.zimride.com

About Zimride:

Zimride, the largest online social rideshare community in North America, is building a marketplace for drivers to sell empty seats in their car by matching them with passengers traveling along the same route. In addition to public routes like San Francisco to Los Angeles, Zimride has implemented networks for over 120 of the nation’s leading universities and companies including Stanford, UCLA, University of Michigan, Facebook and Jet Blue.

Zimride makes sharing rides for drivers and passengers fun, easy and social. It’s a new spin on ridesharing, using social networks to enable real connections. In seconds you can set up a profile, see and book a ride in your area, or post a ride of your own. With Zimride profiles, you can view photos, music and radio preferences to ensure an enjoyable ride.

Zimride proves that “life is better when you share the ride”

Get started at: www.zimride.com

How to have a safe and fun trip in the Sierra Nevada Range this Winter

Winter TruckeeOk, the snow dances have finally worked and we officially have snow accumulations in the Sierra. People travel far and wide to bear witness to our unbelievable snow conditions, and those plans to visit Reno Tahoe are underway!

Winter driving on roads and the highways in the Sierra can be a bit uncomfortable for some people who haven’t driven in snowy conditions before, but it can ultimately be a pleasurable journey if you are prepared.  Always remember, getting there is just the beginning of your winter vacation, and once you make it to your destination, the fun and adventure really starts. Plus, we are incredibly lucky that our road crews in California and Nevada work around the clock to keep our roadways clear and safe.

Before heading into the Sierra or any other snow country here is a list of several things to take care of before you leave the house:

  • Make sure your windshield wipers, defroster, heater, exhaust system and brakes are in top condition.
  • Check your tires. Make sure the tread is in good condition and they are properly inflated.
  • At all times, try to keep your gas tank at least half full to avoid gas line freeze-up.
  • If possible, avoid using your parking brake in cold, rainy and snowy weather, as it may freeze up and no longer disengage.
  • Check your antifreeze and be ready for freezing temperatures.
  • Make sure you have concentrated (non freezing) windshield washer fluid to the windshield washer fluid reservoir to prevent an icy windshield.
  • Always carry chains. Make sure they are the proper size for your tires and are in working order. You might want to take along a flashlight and chain repair links. Chains must be installed on the drive wheels. Make sure you know if your vehicle is front or rear wheel drive.
  • Carry about $50 in cash (smaller denominations are best) in case you get to a point and need to have assistance putting chains on, and taken off of your vehicle.  
  • It is also a good idea to take along water, non-perishable food, warm blankets and extra clothing. A lengthy delay will make you glad you have them.
  • Weather conditions may warrant you to detour from the main road. It is strongly suggested that you always keep an updated map containing the Sierra area.
  • Put an extra car key in your pocket. Many motorists keep their vehicles running when they get out of their vehicle to keep the vehicle warm and have locked themselves out of their cars when putting on chains and at ski areas.

 Once you have your vehicle ready to go, think about these driving tips as you get on the road:

  • Avoid driving while you’re fatigued. Getting the proper amount of rest before taking on winter weather tasks reduces driving risks.
  • Do not use cruise control when driving on any slippery surface (wet, ice, sand).
  • Always allow enough time for your trip. Winter driving in the Sierras can take longer than other times of the year, especially if you encounter storm conditions or icy roads. So, get an early start and allow plenty of time to reach your destination.
  • Accelerate and decelerate slowly. Applying the gas slowly to accelerate is the best method for regaining traction and avoiding skids.  Remember: It takes longer to slow down on icy roads.
  • Drive slowly. Everything takes longer on snow-covered roads. Normal dry pavement following distance of three to four seconds should be increased to eight to ten seconds.
  • Don’t stop if you can avoid it.  But if you need to stop, keep the heel of your foot on the floor and use the ball of your foot to apply firm, steady pressure on the brake pedal.
  • If you can help it, don’t stop going up a hill. There’s nothing worse than trying to get moving up a hill on an icy road. Get some inertia going on a flat roadway before you take on the hill.
  • Keep your gas tank full. It may be necessary to change routes or turn back during a bad storm or you may be caught in a traffic delay.
  • Keep windshield and windows clear. You may want to stop at a safe turnout to use a snow brush or scraper. Use the car defroster and a clean cloth to keep the windows free of fog.
  • Slow down. Even if you have a 4-wheel drive truck, a highway speed of 65 miles per hour may be safe in dry weather, but an invitation for trouble on snow and ice.
  • Be more observant. Visibility is often limited in winter by weather conditions. Slow down and watch for other vehicles that have flashing lights, visibility may be so restricted during a storm that it is difficult to see the slow moving equipment.
  • When stalled, stay with your vehicle and try to conserve fuel while maintaining warmth. Be alert to any possible exhaust or monoxide problems.

Here are a few tips for driving in the Sierra during icy or snowy weather:

  • Accelerate and decelerate slowly. Applying the gas slowly to accelerate is the best method for regaining traction and avoiding skids. Don’t try to get moving in a hurry. And take time to slow down for a stoplight. Remember: It takes longer to slow down on icy roads.
  • Drive slowly. Everything takes longer on snow-covered roads. Accelerating, stopping, turning – nothing happens as quickly as on dry pavement. Give yourself time to maneuver by driving slowly.
  • The normal dry pavement following distance of three to four seconds should be increased to eight to ten seconds (5 car lengths). This improved margin of safety will provide the longer space needed if you have to stop.
  • Whether you have antilock brakes or not, the best way to stop is threshold breaking. Keep the heel of your foot on the floor and use the ball of your foot to apply firm, steady pressure on the brake pedal.
  • Don’t stop if you can avoid it. There’s a big difference in the amount of inertia it takes to start moving from a full stop versus how much it takes to get moving while still rolling. If you can slow down enough to keep rolling until a traffic light changes, do it.
  • Don’t power up hills. Applying extra gas on snow-covered roads will just start your wheels spinning.   As you reach the top of a hill, reduce your speed and possible down shift as you proceed downhill as slowly as possible.
  • Don’t stop going up an incline. There’s nothing worse than trying to get moving up a hill on an icy road. 

If you end up entering an area that has chain controls;

  • You must stop and put on chains when highway signs indicate chains are required. You can be cited and fined if you don’t. You will usually have about a half a mile to a mile between the “Chains Required” sign and the checkpoint to confirm you have installed your chains.
  • Control areas can change rapidly from place to place because of changing weather and road conditions.
  • In most cases, the speed limit when chains are required is 15 to 25 miles an hour.
  • When you put on chains, wait until you can pull completely off the roadway to the right. Do not stop in a traffic lane where you will endanger yourself and block traffic.
  • If you use a chain installer, be sure to get a receipt and jot the installer’s badge number on it. Remember, chain installers are independent business people, and are not allowed by law to sell or rent chains.
  • When removing chains, drive beyond the signs reading “End of Chain Control” to a pull-off area where you can safely remove them.

 

In the event you see a snowplow or other snow removal equipment on the road, here are a few simple rules to follow:

  • Use care when following, passing or approaching any snow removal equipment, even if it appears to be parked.
  • Drive a safe distance behind snowplows. Plows often travel slower than other vehicles to remove snow and to apply sand and liquid deicers.
  • Before attempting to pass snow removal equipment, check the direction the snow and debris is being thrown from the vehicle. Also, remember that snowplows are wider than most vehicles and portions of the plow and blade may be obscured by blowing snow.
  • Don’t ever drive extended distances beside a snowplow, as they can shift sideways after hitting snow packs or drifts.
  • When a plow approaches you, allow the plow room to operate by reducing speed and moving to the right side of the road if there is room to safely do so.
  • Make sure to not brake with unnecessary sudden movements when in front of a snowplow – they cannot stop as quickly as a standard automobile.

 

If you are making a winter kit for your vehicle, here is a short recommended list of what you may want to include in that kit:

  • Rechargeable flashlight
  • Cell phone car adapter
  • Non-perishable food and water
  • Flares
  • Tools: jack, lug wrench and collapsible  shovel
  • Road maps for your trip and the surrounding areas
  • Blanket or sleeping bag(s)
  • Spare set of warm dry clothes, boots, hat and gloves
  • First aid kit, including a couple of days of any prescription medications
  • Pocket knife
  • Matches or lighter
  • Battery jumper cables
  • Ice scraper and snow brush
  • Paper towels
  • Extra windshield washer fluid     

If you travel with young children, an infant or baby, pack extra age appropriate food, warm clothes and blankets, toys, and extra diapers (if appropriate)  just in case. Most importantly, remember to make sure your child safety seat is installed properly.

Before leaving on your trip, tell a friend where you are going, the planned route, and when you anticipate arriving. Keep them updated on any major route or arrival changes.

Numbers and websites to know before you go:

CALTRANS Highway Conditions:

NDOT (Nevada Department of Transportation) Winter Driving Conditions

Men’s Journal Names Reno among Top 25 Places to Live

Mens Journal.jpgIf you live in Reno or have been lucky enough to visit, you know it’s a no-brainer. It’s a great getaway, let alone a fantastic place to reside. There’s never a dull moment in the Biggest Little City, from year-round entertainment, recreational options galore and all at an affordable cost. Men’s Journal Magazine recognizes Reno’s AAA Aces ballpark, the Riverwalk District, Artown and the city’s proximity to abundant outdoor recreations as several reasons why Reno had to be among the top 25 cities for “Best Places to Live 2010”, according to the April issue of Men’s Journal magazine.

The top 25 cities were included in various categories and determined by three variables including median home price, cost of living compared to the rest of the United States and number of sunny days per year.  Reno is featured as tops for “Ski and Climb Without the Crowds” listing Reno’s median home price as $274,670, its cost of living as 13 percent higher than the rest of the nation, and boasting 252 sunny days per year.

“Having Reno named one of the best places to live is a huge honor for our city and residents,” said Reno Mayor Bob Cashell.  “We all know why we love this place, but the national recognition helps build credibility for our city as a top place to live, work and raise a family.  It also gets the word out about what makes our city so special including our downtown baseball park, Artown and burgeoning downtown.”

“Reno making a top places to live list helps increase awareness nationwide that Reno Tahoe is a happening place where locals and visitors alike can enjoy all this area offers, from downtown fun to high altitude adventure.” said Ellen Oppenheim, Reno Sparks Convention and Visitors Authority (RSCVA) President and CEO.  “The recent investment in area hotel-casino properties, spas and restaurants are additional outstanding amenities locals and visitors can take advantage of.”

The April issue of Men’s Journal featuring the “Best Places to Live 2010” is on newsstands now or visit www.mensjournal.com.

Men’s Journal has previously ranked Reno’s historic Old Southwest as one of ‘The Best Neighborhoods in America’ in their June 2009 issue.

We’ve been tooting our own horn for a while. It’s nice to get some validation, though, dontcha think?

Top Ten Reasons the Roaming Gnome should have come to Tahoe

travelocity-gnome-tahoeTop Ten Reasons the Roaming Gnome should should have broken his Cabin Fever in Tahoe rather than Utah in Travelocity’s Top Ski Destination contest.

1.     Ski in two states at the same time at Heavenly while looking at the deep blue of Lake Tahoe, even with your narrow gnome stance

2.     Go on a blind date with Tahoe Tessie (Lake Tahoe’s mythical resident “sea creature”).

3.     Depending on how the date goes, perhaps a quick wedding and an even quicker divorce in Reno.

4.     50 Tram laps at Squaw Valley USA to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the first televised Winter Olympic Games.

5.     Tempt fate with a visit to the Donner Party museum,  just hope they don’t think you’re a chocolate filled gnome.

6.     Our drinks have personality with drinks like the ‘Wet Woody’, the ‘Scorpion’ and the ‘Flaming Kava Kava’. Gnomes keep your beards away from the flames!

7.     Forgot your skis?  No problem, where else but in Sparks can you get your skis, ride a Ferris Wheel and drive a NASCAR simulator in one mega sports store?

8.     Follow in the footsteps of Ol’ Blue Eyes and Marilyn Monroe in the tunnels at the historic Cal Neva Lodge

9.     Spend a little downtime at the spa before heading out for a long night in Reno

10.    Satisfy a late night hunger at what has been heralded as one of the best burgers in the country, the Awful Awful, awfully big, awfully good, don’t be scared my friend, you can do it.

It’s never too early to think about skiing! 2009-10 Lake Tahoe Six-Pack now on sale!

lifttickets-main-order

The Ski Lake Tahoe Six-Pack offers 6 days of skiing or riding at 7 fantastic resorts, all for $269. The lift tickets are flexible, allowing you to go choose one of two resorts with each ticket.

The Ski Lake Tahoe Six-Pack includes:

  • 1 ticket valid at either Heavenly, Kirkwood or Mt. Rose-Ski Tahoe
  • 1 ticket valid at either Heavenly or Sierra-at-Tahoe®
  • 1 ticket valid at either Kirkwood or Sierra-at-Tahoe®
  • 1 ticket valid at either Alpine Meadows or Northstar-at-Tahoe™
  • 1 ticket valid at either Squaw Valley USA, Northstar-at-Tahoe™  or Mt. Rose-Ski Tahoe
  • 1 ticket valid at either Squaw Valley USA or Alpine Meadows

Note: Only 1 voucher per Six-Pack redeemable per resort, per day.

Holiday Blackout Dates include: Nov. 28-29, 2009; Dec. 26, 2009 – Jan. 2, 2010; Jan. 16-17, 2010; Feb. 13-14, 2010.

Want to learn more about the Six-Pack? Go online

Ski blog keeps you connected to the slopes

snowboarder300Ski and board season is going strong in Reno-Tahoe, and we’re blogging about it at Ski and Board Reno-Tahoe, the region’s stop for snow sports news and events. Learn about deals, resort reviews and events and submit your own adventure online.

Planning a Reno-Tahoe ski getaway? Shop online for discounted packages.



Elvis sighting at Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe

Mt. Rose ski resort’s annual tribute to the birth of “The King” is slated for this Saturday, Jan. 10. Resort employees – from ticket sellers to lift operators and instructors – will be in full Elvis regalia for this fun annual event. Visitors also dress for the occasion, and show off their Elvis chops.

Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe is located just 25 minutes from Reno, and features the highest base elevation of Lake Tahoe’s 18 ski and board resorts. With nearly 1,200 acres and eight lifts, including two high-speed six-seaters, it offers some of the best, most convenient terrain in the Lake Tahoe Basin.

For weather, resort and ticket information for Mt. Rose and other regional ski resorts, log on to our searchable ski page.