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It’s never too early to think about skiing! 2009-10 Lake Tahoe Six-Pack now on sale!

lifttickets-main-order

The Ski Lake Tahoe Six-Pack offers 6 days of skiing or riding at 7 fantastic resorts, all for $269. The lift tickets are flexible, allowing you to go choose one of two resorts with each ticket.

The Ski Lake Tahoe Six-Pack includes:

  • 1 ticket valid at either Heavenly, Kirkwood or Mt. Rose-Ski Tahoe
  • 1 ticket valid at either Heavenly or Sierra-at-Tahoe®
  • 1 ticket valid at either Kirkwood or Sierra-at-Tahoe®
  • 1 ticket valid at either Alpine Meadows or Northstar-at-Tahoe™
  • 1 ticket valid at either Squaw Valley USA, Northstar-at-Tahoe™  or Mt. Rose-Ski Tahoe
  • 1 ticket valid at either Squaw Valley USA or Alpine Meadows

Note: Only 1 voucher per Six-Pack redeemable per resort, per day.

Holiday Blackout Dates include: Nov. 28-29, 2009; Dec. 26, 2009 – Jan. 2, 2010; Jan. 16-17, 2010; Feb. 13-14, 2010.

Want to learn more about the Six-Pack? Go online

December, the tale of two months


Peek of Tahoe

Originally uploaded by RenoTahoe

The month of December started on a somber note for skiers and boarders in Reno-Tahoe – at the beginning of the month a couple of good early storms put down a base, but it was dwindling. But Mother Nature served up enough snow this week to more than make up for the paltry beginning of the season.

Powder hounds woke up to more than two feet of fresh snow today, and bluebird conditions at Alpine Meadows, where blue skies and moderate temperatures made for the perfect Sierra Nevada ski day. Check out more pics from Alpine over at our flickr site.

Reno-Tahoe’s 18 ski and board resorts all received strong snow totals from a week of on-again, off-again storms, with the biggest system hitting Christmas Day. Alpine’s official measurement as of Dec. 26 was nine feet of snow at the base, and more than 13 feet at the summit, ensuring plenty of snow for a long season.

Now is the time to book your Reno-Tahoe getaway and get a taste of this great snow. Shop online and get discounts on lodging and lift-ticket combos.

Video: Sierra ski and board conditions are ideal

What started as a meager ski season with a couple good early season storms and then a long, warm lull, has evolved into a powder-seekers dream in the Sierra Nevada. The last week has brought several feet of new snow to area ski resorts, and another storm system is expected through Christmas Day to add a couple more feet to the total.

What does all this mean? It means it is time to take advantage of discounted rates and book a ski trip to Reno-Tahoe. You’ll be glad you did …

Helmet cam view of Alpine Meadows on Sunday:


We have snow … now plan your trip

Visitrenotahoe.com has stepped up efforts by creating searchable ski-planning Web pages with up-to-the-minute weather forecasts and snow conditions, pricing and driving directions. Users can browse Reno-Tahoe’s 18 ski and board resorts based on everything from difficulty to location, and get access to special offers and discounts.

The snow has been falling consistently since Saturday, with healthy snow totals at all area resorts – high-elevation totals may exceed three feet by next weekend, according to the National Weather Service, guaranteeing some serious powder turns, especially at higher elevations.

Snow conditions are provided by Onthesnow.com multiple times daily, ensuring frequent, accurate results. Bookmark our site, and use us as to plan your sierra ski vacation this winter.

Summit elevations in Reno-Tahoe range from 7,350 to 10,100 feet, and most years we get a 20-foot snow pack and a ski season that can last until the Fourth of July.

Reno-Tahoe boasts the largest concentration of ski and snowboard resorts in North America, all located within 90 minutes of the Reno-Tahoe International Airport. Visitors can stay, play and experience a winter getaway with a unique mix of outdoor recreation, arts and culture, dining, entertainment and 24-hour Nevada-style gaming action right outside their hotel room door. Off the slopes you will find ice-skating, sledding, snowshoeing, or dog-sledding.

Video: Doing the Reno-Tahoe snow dance

Cold-fronts, jet streams and el nino are all well and good, but in Reno-Tahoe we don’t leave anything to chance when it comes to winter powder:

Countdown to ski and board season

We’re barely a month into fall, and already Reno-Tahoe has had a nice dusting of snow – with more (hopefully) on the way soon. Local ski and board resorts are getting ready too, with opening dates set for next month.

If you’re not ready, here’s a taste of Tahoe powder to whet your appetite:

Backcountry ski/board on Mt. Tallac

View from Tallac South to Heavenly
The view from Mt. Tallac looking south toward Lake Tahoe (left) and Fallen Leaf Lake (right). Photo / Jim Scripps

With temperatures in the 60s, spring skiing and boarding is in the air in Reno-Tahoe, a good time for the hardier ski-hikers to make a backcountry trek up Mt. Tallac, one the Sierra’s most accessible routes and home to unrivaled views of Lake Tahoe and the eastern Sierra below.

Although Tallac’s approach may be tough for the “fitness-challenged” – it registers 9,735 feet, a 3,255-foot gain to the summit – it’s high vantage point and open, skiable terrain make it well worth the hike. MiketheBike and I escorted a three-man editorial team from Backcountry Magazine up Mt. Tallac on March 6 to give them a taste of spring corn and clear blue skies.

Chilly morning air gave way to warm temperatures as we started up the trailhead around 10 a.m. Mikethebike, Justin and Justin (keeping names straight was also a little tough) sported randonee skis, Mike skinned a split snowboard, and I snowshoed, carrying my snowboard on my back. While the snow started out bulletproof, by the time we reached about 7,500 feet it started to loosen up, a good time for soft turns. I was the first to bail – tired of lugging my board, I strapped it on and ripped a good long run down the canyon. The others would continue toward the summit.

The snow started to harden up by the time my fellow travelers headed down, give them a bone-jarring ride. It turns out the best time to descend was between 2-3 p.m. And regardless of the snow condition, Tallac on a clear sunny day offers one of the best views available for the backcountry enthusiast.

To get to the (winter) Tallac trailhead (map): From Lake Tahoe’s South Shore take Highway 89 toward Emerald Bay. Turn west on Spring Creek Road, the first road after the Baldwin Beach turnoff. The end of the road is the start of the trail. From the trailhead, the summit is approximately 2.2 miles. Climb time varies based on snow conditions … and be prepared for avalanche danger before attempting any backcountry ski trip.

(Check back for a video of backcountry on Tallac…)

- Jim Scripps